Character Assessment · Uncategorized

Hamilton Relationships: Act Two

Here I am at long last *rolls eyes at myself*. Let’s hear H.G.’s fabulous excuse for this time, shall we?

On AO3 (Archive of Our Own) I started writing a Trio fanfiction in December. That fanfiction is currently at 13 chapters, about twenty thousand words. And it has become insanely popular. I have no idea WHAT is going on, but I guess people like it, because it is at 115 kudos and one thousand + hits. So I’ve been satisfying my readers by updating that more than anything. Literally, I hardly even work on my book anymore. I’m taking a one-month hiatus in February, so then I should be on here a little more, writing blog posts more often. For now, let’s honor the relationships of Act Two in Hamilton. As always, major spoilers.

 

Alexander Hamilton/Eliza Hamilton

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Alexander is not a very good husband to Eliza around the beginning of Act Two. He chooses his work over her, and rather than accompany her to her father’s, upstate, he has her go with Angelica, and without him. Then, while she’s gone, he cheats on her. Even worse, he keeps that fact a secret from her for years. His enemies find out before she does. Alexander and Eliza have kids at this point, and while she still loves him just as much as always, he begins to feel a little different about her. He’s betrayed her. It’s hard to recover from that. He is guilty and distanced from her. When he finds out some people think he was stealing government funds, he publicizes the details of his affair to show that he was actually using his own money to pay his mistress’s husband. Eliza had no idea. She’s finding out at the same time as the whole world. Furious and heart broken, she burns his letters to her and banishes Alexander from her heart. (Slay, queen, slay.) Their son Philip decides it’s up to him to protect Alexander’s honor, and when a guy challenges it, Philip challenges him – to a duel. Philip dies. Alexander realizes this was all kind of his fault, and now he needs to take the blame and make things right. He asks for Eliza’s forgiveness, and, wonderful woman that she is, she gives it. From then on, they fall back in love and patch up everything that’s broken… only for Alexander to leave her, too. Even after his death, though, Eliza goes on loving him and carries on his legacy. She does everything to keep his story alive. She does more than enough and more than he deserves. You go, Eliza.

Alexander Hamilton/Maria Reynolds

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This is where things get eyebrow-raise-y

I’ve already talked a lot about Maria in other posts, so I’ll keep this brief. Alexander offers money to Maria after she comes to his house and tells him her husband has left her and she is broke. Only problem is, Alexander’s also pretty lonely and Maria is really pitiable/attractive/good at seducing people, so he ends up cheating on Eliza with her. Poor Maria is twenty-three and under her husband’s command, so she has no way to back out of the affair. Plus she’s also lonely, and terrified that Alexander is going to leave her all alone. That of course would make her husband even more angry, as it would mean no more money. So Alexander digs a pit and falls into it… and then keeps digging. Then he flies out of the pit with copies of a pamphlet about the affair and throws them everywhere. Bad idea. Nice going, Alexander.

Thomas Jefferson & James Madison

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Jefferson and Madison are the dynamic duo of… pretty much everything. Together, they bring about Alexander’s demise with the Reynolds Pamphlet. Madison is Jefferson’s second fiddle (read that in a book), but important all the same. They’re pretty tight – a bond forged in sass, judgmentalism (is that a word?), rapping, writing, and mic drops (Jefferson drops, Madison catches). It’s pretty much to only bromance in Act Two, but it’s great, so no worries. Jefferson is fabulous and flashy, while Madison is much more quiet, silent power that you didn’t even realize was power. They cover each other’s flaws and complement each other’s strengths, so if these two come at you… watch out.

Eliza Hamilton & Angelica Schuyler

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Angelica continues to support Eliza. Selflessly. In “The Reynolds Pamphlet”, Angelica is there to tell Alexander off, and informs him that she loves her sister more than anything. More than she has ever loved him. In a cut song, “Congratulations”, she talks about how she lived in an unhappy marriage an ocean away, sacrificing everything so Alexander and Eliza could be happy. I just need to post the lyrics. I don’t have words for how much Angelica loves Eliza.

[ANGELICA]
You’ve redefined your legacy, congratulations!

[HAMILTON]
It was an act of political sacrifice

[ANGELICA]
Sacrifice?
I languished in a loveless marriage in London
I lived only to read your letters
I look at you and think:
“God, what have we done with our lives and what did it get us?”
That doesn’t wipe the tears of the years away
But I’m back in the city and I’m here to stay
And you know what I’m here to do?

[HAMILTON]
Angelica…

[ANGELICA]
I’m not here for you

I know my sister like I know my own mind
You will never find anyone as trusting or as kind
And a million years ago she said to me,
“This one’s mine”
So I stood by
Do you know why?

I love my sister more than anything in this life
I will choose her happiness over mine every time

 

This is what true love looks like, my friends.

Alexander Hamilton & Aaron Burr

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Throughout Act Two, the relationship between Hamilton and Burr becomes more and more complicated. Hamilton makes bad choices and a few enemies. Burr sides with said enemies and judges his old friend with them. Aaron Burr actually doesn’t have a political position, and he starts to feel left out. To fix this, he runs for Senator against Philip Schuyler, Alexander’s father-in-law, and wins. In the end, that deepens the divide between them. By Cabinet Battle #2, Burr is majorly annoyed that Hamilton always gets whatever he wants and never faces consequences. He teams up with the Southern Democratic-Republicans to rip Alexander apart from the inside out. They go through his history as Treasurer and stumble across the shocking amount of money being spent. When they confront him, Hamilton tells them about his affair and then, to their delight, makes it public. Finally getting ahead, Burr decides to run for president. Hamilton endorses Jefferson, who ends up winning, leaving Burr as vice-President. Thinking that they’ll at least be able to work together, Burr goes to talk to Jefferson, who laughs at him and slams the door of friendship in his face. Now Burr is mad. He turns to Hamilton as a way to vent his anger, and Hamilton responds by being rather obnoxious and unapologetic. Burr kills him. (It’s a little more complicated than that, but I’d rather not think about it or the day will be ruined for me.) Hamilton is dead. The end. *runs to clutch ten dollar bills and cry because she is too distraught to elaborate*

Thomas Jefferson vs Alexander Hamilton

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I’ve talked a bit about them in the Hamilton and Burr section. Hamilton and Jefferson loathe each other. In fact, if Jefferson had killed Hamilton, we all would probably be a lot less sad and a lot more, “Yeah, I kinda expected that.” They agree on literally nothing. They are not friends for a single instant. From the moment they meet until the day Hamilton dies, they dislike each other. Yes, Hamilton endorses Jefferson for president, but not out of a genuine like for him – more that he believes him to be slightly better suited than Burr for the job. I guess the only thing they agree on is that they’re both friends with Lafayette. But that’s it.

 

Well, thus ends the Hamilton post series. Expect more posts on this show at some point, however. I’ll love it till the day I die, so it ain’t goin away any time soon.

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